• Characteristics Earwigs are a distinctive group of insects of small to medium size, ranging from 5 to 50 millimetres in length. Earwigs are sometimes confused with Staphylinid beetles, but can be distinguished from the latter by the presence of pincer-like cerci, which Staphylinid beetles lack. Earwigs are mostly dark coloured (brown to black) and can be recognised by the following features: Labidura truncata Labidura truncata (LABIDURIDAE) Flattened elongated body Heavily sclerotised pincer-like cerci. Females have straight cerci with a inward pointing tip and males have curved cerci 2 pairs of wings. The forewings are short and protectively hardened. The hind wings are membranous and folded in a fan-like way underneath the forewings when not in use. Some species are also wingless Chewing (mandibulate) mouthparts Moderately long antennae The LABIDURIDAE family of earwigs consists of relatively primitive species that are predominantly a red-brown colour and range from 10 to 45 millimetres in length. Members of this family are found all over Australia. Labidura truncata is by far the commonest species, particularly in sandy habitats. It is approximately 35 millimetres long and dull brown with straw coloured markings. The male have long slender pincers with a distinctive tooth near the middle of the inner edge.